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Workbench lighting
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Author:  Dclapp [ 02 Feb 2014, 05:49 ]
Post subject:  Workbench lighting

I'm about to redo my work area and would like to have a wonderful lighting – to help my old eyes and clumsy fingers! What do you wizards use?

Anyone use those round magnifiers; with extendable arms; some with lighted surrounds? Any good links or recommendations? Thanks so much in advance for your advice.

Doug

Author:  Geek [ 02 Feb 2014, 06:26 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

One of those 4', dual T-8 flourescent tube plugin lighting dealies for $17 from Home Depot :D

Plus a swing desklamp for close-in work.

Author:  Soundbrigade [ 29 Mar 2014, 15:57 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

For a completey other project I ordered two rolls of LED-lights (12VDC) but came to think of this rather different design.
At my work I took a piece of sheet metal (1 meter by 16-17cm), bent it in almost an U-shape and taped three rows of the LED-lists, connected them and hooked it up to a 12V wallwart taken from an external HDD-enclosure. My LEDS are cold white, but someone had tried something similar with cold white LEDs and a set of warm white.

My design looks like this - note the hooks to have it hanging from the ceiling:
Image

Image

Image

Lighting up my workbench, before I tidied it up :blush:
Image

Author:  mwhouston [ 29 Mar 2014, 16:49 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

Magnus: looks good. I use a crappy desk lamp with a ECO Fluro lamp. Not good but it works.

Author:  gofar99 [ 29 Mar 2014, 22:43 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

Hi, I ordered some of the same LEDs. Four rolls from someplace in Asia. Cheap and they have sticky backs. You cut them up into lengths you need, in three LED groups. Great inside cabinets and under shelves. For the electronics bench though I use two magnifiers. One is a 5 X 7 inch with dual G23 7watt florescent tubes (came from Frys Electronics some years ago) the other is a 5 inch circular one with a boat load of LEDs (this one is a current Parts Express item). The big one is better for doing chassis sized work the small for more detailed stuff. I have found that there is no such thing as too much light when working on projects. In the large part of the shop (was a garage once) where I do metal working, wood working and painting there are 5 dual T40 overhead lights that can be individually switched on and off plus a few spot lights on things like the drill press.

And....unlike things I used to do in the past, I now clean up the benches after a project is finished.

Good listening
Bruce

Author:  mwhouston [ 29 Mar 2014, 22:55 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

I promised the wife, after the 6V6 amp (currently underway), I would pull apart the LAB and repack. It will be a massive job and one I am dreading. With luck I'll heart attack before then and not have to do it.

Author:  Soundbrigade [ 30 Mar 2014, 01:34 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

gofar99 wrote:
And....unlike things I used to do in the past, I now clean up the benches after a project is finished.


I constantly have so many projects running that I never get a chance to tidy up ... :idea:

Author:  RossD [ 09 Apr 2014, 12:49 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

I have a roll of those LED lights. I might have to try making a light bar too. I have the same (2) 4' T-8, plug in and swing arm setup that Geek mentioned.

Right now my work bench has sawdust all over it. I'm making Arts and Crafts style things (small shelf, bookshelf, wall bench)

Author:  Fafhrd [ 09 Nov 2014, 05:41 ]
Post subject:  Re: Workbench lighting

I have a discarded (due to progressive LCD pixel failure) 32" flat screen cold cathode tv body mounted high on the wall of my small workroom. With the LCD panel and some of the diffusers removed, it makes an excellent bright daylight substitute and I think a good alternative to a "SAD" lamp!

Attachment:
20141109_083445_Android1.jpg


The CCL is flicker free and silent. The size of the light emitting surface and the proximity of the ceiling as primary reflector means that there are no sharp shadows cast, and being above eye height, it has little opportunity to dazzle.

Attachment:
20141109_084713_Android1.jpg


And yes, I use those mounted magnifiers - but I cannot recommend a supplier.

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